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Babe Ruth,Ty Cobb,Cy Young,Roger Maris, Lou Gehrig,Bear Bryant,Muhammad Ali, and Autographed Cards and Other Items

CY YOUNG Signed LEAF EXECUTIVE COLLECTION MASTERPIECE 1/1 PSA DNA

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CY YOUNG Signed LEAF EXECUTIVE COLLECTION MASTERPIECE 1/1 PSA DNA
A beautiful Cy Young card with a nice 1940s signature complete with his "Peoli" inscription. He retired to his farm in Peoli, Ohio. Autograph is authenticated by PSA/DNA. Card is in brand-new mint condition in a Beckett BGS protective holder. Denton True "Cy" Young (March 29, 1867-November 4, 1955) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. During his 22-year baseball career (1890-1911), he pitched for five different teams. Young established numerous pitching records, some of which have stood for a century. Young compiled 511 wins, which is most in Major League history and 94 ahead of Walter Johnson who is second on the list. Young was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. One year after Young's death, the Cy Young Award was created to honor the previous season's best pitcher. In addition to wins, Young still holds the major league records for most career innings pitched (7,355), most career games started (815), and most complete games (749). He also retired with 316 losses, the most in MLB history. Young's 76 career shutouts are fourth all-time. He also won at least 30 games in a season five times, with ten other seasons of 20 or more wins.In addition, Young pitched three no-hitters, including the third perfect game in baseball history, first in baseball's "modern era". In 1999, 88 years after his final major league appearance and 44 years after his death, editors at The Sporting News ranked Cy Young 14th on their list of "Baseball's 100 Greatest Players".That same year, baseball fans named him to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Young's career started in 1890 with the Cleveland Spiders. After eight years with the Spiders, Young was moved to St. Louis in 1899. After two years there, Young jumped to the newly-created American League, joining the Boston franchise. He was traded back to Cleveland in 1909, before spending the final two months of his career with the Boston Rustlers. After his retirement, Young went back to his farm in Ohio, where he stayed until his death at age 88 in 1955.
Posted on August 11, 2012 Slideshow